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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

Playing on its home turf, Park City High School's robotics teams swept the competition.

Five of its teams made it to the semi-finals and qualified for the state championships during the tournament, which was held at the school over the weekend. Three of the five teams were made up of rookie players who were new to robotics, and the veteran team Inconceivable finished first overall.

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Checkmate's Maxwell Pilzer, left, and Jack Giebe, second from left ,direct their robot during
an alliance round at Park City High School during a robotics tournament  at the school on Saturday. 
Checkmate was working with Inconceivable (rear) at the Robominers during the round.  The three teams
won the alliance round, with Inconceivable as the winning alliance captain. 
(Photo by Tanzi Propst/Park Record)

 Note: PCEF donor support PCHS Robotics.

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

On Brittney Mellin's first day at Parley's Park Elementary School, she thought it was odd her peers were switching between Spanish and English throughout the day.

But as a bilingual child herself, she went along with it and assumed that's just how school was in Utah. It was not until later that she realized she was in a program a small percentage of students throughout the country are able to participate in.

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Vicky Rudoph teaches Spanish to second-grade students at Parkey's Park Elementary School as part of
Park City School District's dual-language immersion program.  It has been a challenge for the district to
adopt and modify courses and lessons throughout all schools, but teachers, administrators, and students
say they are happy with the success of the program. (Photo by Tanzi Propst/Park Record)

 Note: PCEF donor have supported DLI since 2008.

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

The next generation of journalists is putting pen to the paper.

Students at Ecker Hill Middle School recently wrote articles and compiled them into the first-ever Ecker Record. The student newspaper, which reports about local and national news, was recently printed

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Michele Roepke, editor and organizer of the Ecker Record,
teaches proper interview techniques to her students while
demonstrating with student Cooper Ford. The Ecker Record
is Ecker Hill Middle School's new n
ewspaper.
 

(Image courtesy of Michele Roepke).

 Note: PCEF donor support the EHMS After School Program.

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

Every week, students at Treasure Mountain Junior High show up to work. They take the teachers' orders, make coffee and serve the drinks from a coffee cart in their work uniforms.

Cierra Fitz, a special education teacher at the school, said the students with special needs learn a variety of skills from the coffee cart program, such as responsibility and how to work as a team. Treasure Mountain is one of four schools in the Park City School District that gives special education students the opportunity to make and sell coffee for teachers, and one of several schools that utilize Park City Education Foundation grants to make a difference in the lives of students with special needs. Jen Billow, associate director of communications and development for the foundation, said the organization funds numerous programs in the district, and it seems that the theme of those programs increasingly focuses on special education.

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Students in Dan Gallery's class serve coffee to teachers as a part of
the coffee cart at Ecker Hill Middle School. It is one of several programs in the
Park City School District funded by the Park City Education Foundation.
 

(Image courtesy of Dan Gallery).

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

The Park City High School debate team has been at the top of its game the last few years, and as the team steps into this season, members anticipate another remarkable year.

Many veteran debaters are returning with their eyes set on big achievements, while newcomers are jumping into the competition scene eager to prove themselves.

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Members of the Park City High School debate team won several awards
at the Beehive Bonanza earlier this month, the team's first competition of
the season. The coach, Sharon Ellsworth-Nielson, says the team is
off to a great start. (Photo courtesy of Sharon Ellsworth-Nielson).

Note: PCEF donors support the PCHS Debate Team.

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

When the Park City Board of Education voted earlier this year to remove student fees, people throughout the community were happy to see the Board taking steps to achieve its equitability goals. But as the school year started and groups that had depended on the fee collection website to gather donations were watching their contributions remain stagnant, there was a scramble to quickly find a solution.

Now, after missing out on one of their most lucrative fundraising efforts of the year, some of the parent-teacher organizations, and even the Park City Education Foundation, are off to a bad start.

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A student plays a game during the fall festival at McPolin Elementary School, which is
held by the Parent Teacher Organization.  The PTO depends more on events like the
festival to raise funds over collecting dues at the beginning of the school year.
(Photo courtesy of McPolin Elementary School's PTO)

 

 

 

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